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Pirate Ship Could Never Float

Last-minute work on the Fantasyland Pirate Ship
The beautifully detailed galleon at anchor in a lagoon in Fantasyland was not the slightest bit seaworthy. Instead of ribs that curved to meet at a keel, the bulging sides were framed conventionally and bolted to a concrete slab, like anyone's garage. That it looked like a real boat is a testament to the skill of its designers—Bruce Bushman and Don DaGradi got the window credit—and the carpenters and others, including sculptors Chris Mueller and Blaine Gibson, who created it. The authentic masts and rigging were provided under contract by Todd Shipyards.

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  1. ...and I had my twenty-first birthday lunch there, a tuna melt! I love this website Al, thanks for all your hard work.

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